MRC Students Present at STLP Regional Competition

MRC STLP Project

MRC Students Present at STLP Regional Competition

*Article written by Classcraft Representative

 

Pictured left to right: Sawyer Hall, Steven Brown, Kory Combs, and Apple Thompson              Pictured left to right: Kaylee Campbell, Steven Brown, Kory Combs, Mr. Alonzo Fugate, Lexie McIntosh, Apple Thompson, Sawyer Hall

Pictured left to right: Sawyer Hall, Steven Brown, Kory Combs, and Apple Thompson              Pictured left to right: Kaylee Campbell, Steven Brown, Kory Combs, Mr. Alonzo Fugate, Lexie McIntosh, Apple Thompson, Sawyer Hall

On Wednesday, January 23, sixth-grade students from Marie Roberts-Caney Elementary School in Lost Creek traveled to Pikeville to share an education technology that they believe is solving school and community needs. Their destination, the Kentucky Department of Education's Student Technology Leaders Program (STLP) annual competition.

Students Kaylee Campbell, Lexie McIntosh, Sawyer Hall, Kory Combs, Steven Brown, and Apple Thompson presented edtech product Classcraft and shared the improvements it has made in their classroom to hundreds of students, teachers, and technology administrators at the statewide regional competition.

“We are honored to be chosen as an example of classroom innovation by these bright young leaders showing the way toward the future,” said Shawn Young, a former physics teacher who co-founded Classcraft with his brother Devin Young in 2014. “These students’ dedication to creating community in their classroom and helping other young people embodies the positive changes we’ve been seeing throughout Kentucky as well as the country.”

With a mission to make school more meaningful, Classcraft reframes students’ progress as a game they play throughout the school year. Educators use the game’s tools to engage students in learning and promote skills like leadership and collaboration.

Working in teams, students take on the role of a virtual character and work toward earning in-game currency that can be turned into real-life privileges. The rewards, which can be customized, are aimed at motivating and helping them in class, such as sitting next to a friend or having more time to turn in homework.

Educators can use Classcraft to turn their existing lesson plans into learning adventures, providing an enjoyable way to study and retain information. These adventures can be self-guided and adapted to students’ different needs. The technology also works with the school’s positive behavior system to encourage better behavior and provides real-time data that administrators use to improve students’ social and educational outcomes.

“We have really had a lot of fun with this program this year,” said Sawyer Hall, one of the presenting MRC students. “I think that it has helped a lot with solving some school issues such as good behavior. We get points for things like doing well in class or having good behavior. I like that we can earn points for doing good things in school.”

Classcraft is currently being used daily by 1 in 3 schools nationwide with 1.5 million U.S. students.

“One reason Classcraft is so popular in Kentucky schools is because it easily incorporates personalized learning, which is a key component for successful students and schools,” explained Kelly Babb, Classcraft’s Partnership Manager for Kentucky.

Although the MRC team was just four points shy of being able to progress to state-level competition, they were very proud of their accomplishments and thankful for the opportunity to share the program with others. They were excited to report that, in response to their presentation, several teachers at the event stated they would be exploring Classcraft for use in their classes as well.

To learn more about Classcraft visit www.classcraft.com.

 





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