Preschool  

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Mrs. Sloas

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  • Phonological AwarenessPhonological Awareness

    Ms. Salyers spends time in the preschool class each week. She works with the students to help them acquire an understanding of phonological awareness. Students need to be able to manipulate syllables, onset and rime, and sounds if they are going to be successful in using letter-sound knowledge effectively for reading and writing. A student’s level of phonological awareness is a strong predictor of future reading success. We would like to thank Ms. Salyers for making learning fun. The students look forward to circle time with her each week.

  • 4Corners Color Formative Assessment activity

    When I first introduced the 4Corners Color/Color Word Formative Assessment; I read the color words and told the student to go stand in the corner where the color was at. After implementing this activity for a week I noticed the students were successful. I wanted the learning experience to be rigorous so I ask the students to read the color word and go stand in the corner where the color was located.

     I placed four of the color cards(colored construction paper)  in four areas of the room and held up one of the color words; without reading the color word. Next, I ask the student “What is the color word?  I accept their answer and said “ Go stand in the corner where the color is.” Once the student selects a corner/color  I ask them “Is that your final answer?”  Then the student asks his/her classmates “Evaluate me”   The classmates will show a thumbs up/down. If the student read the color word and selected the correct color card, the classmates will show a thumbs up, if not a thumbs down. If the student was not successful and the classmates showed a thumbs’ down, I pointed to the color word and spelled it out, then I helped the student sound the color word out. Next I told the student  “ Go stand in the corner where the color is.” Once the student selected a corner/color  I asked them “Is that your final answer?” Then the student asks his/her classmates “Evaluate me” The classmates will show a thumbs up. Parents please continue help your child with the 4Corners Color/Color Word Formative Assessment activity each afternoon.

     

    Materials:

    *color words..only work with four colors at a time

    *color cards(construction paper)

     

     

     

  • Read Across America

    Our school recently participated in Read Across America Day, a nationwide program that encourages adults to promote reading among children. The event coincides with the birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, known to many simply as “Dr. Seuss.”  This is a great way to remind students that it’s important to read, work on literacy, grammar and vocabulary. We would like to thank Mr. Phillip Watts for visiting our classroom and reading “One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish by Dr. Seuss” and “The Foot Book by Dr. Seuss”.

  • Growing PatternGrowing Pattern

    Most patterning experiences for preschool students focus on repeating patterns but they can begin to visualize and talk about growing patterns. Two students created a linear growing pattern that increased by a constant difference. The students enjoy using manipulatives to create patterns.

  • Health Habits: Teeth on the GoHealth Habits: Teeth on the Go

    Teeth on the Go is a statewide oral health education program funded by Delta Dental of Kentucky, catered to preschool through sixth grade students and their teachers. The Teeth on the Go program consists of two components - our free Teeth on the Go oral health learning kits, which can be requested by teachers anywhere in the state. The students used an oversized tooth and toothbrush model to practice good brushing techniques and listened to several children’s books about oral health. The health learning kit is available at www.teethonthegoky.com

  • Bus SafetyBus Safety

    Driver Trainer, Mr. Scotty Spicer discussed bus rules and safety procedures. He explained that the rules were established to keep everyone safe. The students practiced loading and unloading the bus using the hand rail. The drivers conducted a school bus evacuation drill. They explained the proper procedures for safely evacuating the school bus in the event of an emergency. Scotty Spicer discussed the importance of crossing in front of the bus so the driver has a visual of the students. Bus driver, Delmer Bryant took the students for a ride to allow them to demonstrate appropriate behavior while riding the bus. We would like to thank Mr. Spicer and Delmer Bryant for helping the students become familiar with bus safety procedures.

  • Project Based Learning.Dough LettersProject Based Learning.Dough Letters

    Project Based Learning

    The students used playdough and letter cutters to form their names. They placed the letters in the correct order on a colored piece of construction paper. Their work was placed on the playground in the sun so the paper would fade around the playdough letters, leaving the area of the construction paper dark where their dough letter name had been on the paper. The students enjoyed this learning experience. This hands on activity promotes letter and name recognition as well as enhances fine motor muscles. Early childhood classrooms nurture learning by providing daily experiences that build a solid foundation for learning.

  • Heart HealthHeart Health

    Martha Yount visited our classroom and read the book: Thump-Thump: Learning About Your Heart, written by Pamela Hill Nettleton. This book is a great way to give students an overview of how their heart works, what it does for their body, and how to keep it healthy. It is a great introduction to the parts of the heart and circulatory system and how they function. We would like to thank Ms. Yount for visiting our classroom.

  • Hand WashingHand Washing

    Health Educator, Brenda Buntin visited our classroom and read the book “Those Mean Nasty Dirty Downright Disgusting but Invisible Germs” by Judith Anne Rice.  The story encourages the formation of good health habits in children. Through playful and colorful illustrations, this popular children’s book shows the germs that cause illness and how important hand washing is to good health. Ms. Buntin also modeled proper hand washing techniques. We would like to thank Brenda for visiting our  classroom and helping us educate the students on the importance of proper hand washing.

     

     

  • Oral HealthOral Health

    Health Educator, Ms. Brenda Buntin from the Breathitt County Health Department visited our classroom. She presented an educational video about oral health: “Dr. Rabbit and The Legend of Tooth Kingdom! “The video features Dr. Rabbit and Dr. Brushwell — two cartoon dentists who will lead children through the discoveries of oral health. The video also focuses on prevention and teaches good oral health practices that help children’s smiles last a lifetime.

    Tooth Kingdom is a magical place kids will want to visit again and again. Once they've experienced the legend, children will be eager to take care of their own bright smiles. This engaging tale begins in a modern-day dental office, where children are finishing up their dental checkups. But before long, they are magically transported to a time and place long ago - where the smiles of Tooth Kingdom are under attack by Sorcerer Plakula and the Plaque Monsters!

    We would like to thank Ms. Buntin for visiting our classroom and teaching the students about good oral health and how to make it a permanent part of their lives.


  • This student is able to match quantities with numerals. He has been working hard to master this skill. We used puzzles number pieces and counters during this learning experience.

  • Health: Head LiceHealth: Head Lice

    Ms. Odessi Steinmetz visited our classroom and read “Bugs in My Hair” by David Shannon. This is an informative book about head lice and how to get rid of them. The author discusses the shame and humiliation of having bugs in your hair and states when you go to school, or have play dates, chances are good you may get lice.The story also talks about the difficult removal procedure, from zero-tolerance, to medicated oil to a nit comb is depicted in this story. We would like to thank Ms. Odessi for visiting our classroom.

  • Things that Grow: PlantsThings that Grow: Plants

    The students are learning the basics of science. Growing a plant can show students the basics of the life cycle. Plants bring an excitement to young minds, along with a visual explanation of how science works. Simple activities using plants can be the building blocks of a lifelong love of science. The students enjoyed planting flower seeds in individual containers in our greenhouse. The students will care for their plant and take it home once it is mature. We discussed what a plant needs to survive and sang a finger play to enhance the learning experience.

  • Read Across AmericaRead Across America

    We would like to thank Tabitha Napier for visiting our classroom. She read the book "An Amazing Alphabet Book!" by Dr. Seuss. As she read the book she ask the students to identify the letters. After the story was read the students identified the parts of the book and discussed the rules for reading and writing: a book is read from the front cover to the back cover, print is read from left to right, top of the page to the bottom.

  • Lexia Reading Level 3Lexia Reading Level 3

    We would like to congratulate this student. He competed level three in Lexia Reading. In level three he learned blending & segmenting 2, consonant sounds, sight words 1, advanced descriptors, and picturing stories 2.

  • Math ImpactMath Impact

    This student can count to twenty and is able to associate number names and quantities. This learning experience is from Math Impact. A

    Key Mathematics Concepts and Skills:

    • Recognize numerals 1 through 20.
    • Verbally count in sequence.
    • Count out a specified number of objects.
    • Associate written numerals, quantities, and number names.
  • Skip CountingSkip Counting

    We would like to recognize these students. They are able to skip count by 10s to 100:

  • Bess Gross Jr., Bus Driver :Community HelperBess Gross Jr., Bus Driver :Community Helper

    Bus driver, Bess Gross Jr.  visited our classroom and discussed the important role he plays for our school. He described his job duties and how important it is to make sure the student’s arrive at school safely, on time and ready to learn.  We would like to thank Bess for taking time out of his busy schedule to help us with our current standards-based unit of study: Community Helpers.

  • Math ImpactMath Impact

    The students enjoy working with our Math Impact learning experience. Each student has a number card and a true/not true card. The students place their number card in sequence on the number line. After the number line is complete, the students are given another card and must count the fingers/thumbs on the card and determine how many they have. The students must associate the number with quantity. The students use the true/not true cards to state if they agree or disagree with their classmates answer. These cards encourage group participation.The objective is to provide practice with matching writtten numerals and quantities.

  • Uppercase/Lowercase Letter MatchUppercase/Lowercase Letter Match

    The students are excited with our uppercase and lowercase letter match learning experience. Each student has an uppercase letter and a true/not true card. The students identify their letter and place it in sequence under the model on our wall. After the uppercase letters are in order, the students are given a lowercase letter and must match it to the uppercase letter. The students use the true/not true cards to state if they agree or disagree with their classmates answer. These cards encourage group participation.

  • February 14, 2014 P.A.T MeetingFebruary 14, 2014 P.A.T Meeting

    The class had great parent participation during the recent “Parents As Teachers” meeting. The parents worked with their child in various areas of the classroom. Some of the activities engaged in were: puzzles, sorting, number boards with pegs, art, reading, magnetic letters-selecting the child’s name using a model of their name, patterns, music, life skills, bristle blocks, sorting plastic food into food groups, latch board and etc. The food was provided by Family Resource Center Coordinator; Ms. Debra Johnson. We would like to thank the parents for their interest in  Early Childhood Standards. We will have our next “PAT” meeting on March 14th.

  • Community HelpersCommunity Helpers

    Custodians Dean and Daisy Spicer visited our classroom and discussed the important role they play within our school. They described their job duties and how important it is to make sure the building is a clean and safe learning environment. They also discussed maintaining the outdoor environment. We would like to thank them for taking time out of their busy schedule to help us with our current standards-based unit of study: Community Helpers.

  • Community HelpersCommunity Helpers

    Custodians Dean and Daisy Spicer visited our classroom and discussed the important role they play within our school. They described their job duties and how important it is to make sure the building is a clean and safe learning environment. They also discussed maintaining the outdoor environment. We would like to thank them for taking time out of their busy schedule to help us with our current standards-based unit of study: Community Helpers.

  • This student is able to identify the parts of a plant. This student is able to identify the parts of a plant.
  • Science Learning ExperiencesScience Learning Experiences

    The students are enjoying our science learning experiences. They have been working hard to learn the parts of a plant and what a plant needs to survive.  These students are able to identify the parts of a plant and what a plant needs to survive. We are proud of these students.

  • Color PatternsColor Patterns

     This student is able to create A & B color patterns. She chose red and yellow manipulatives to create a simple, repeating color pattern. She is able to create the pattern without a model. The objective is to introduce and provide practice with making and extending color patterns.Key Mathematics Concepts and skills: Copy and extend pattern. Create color patterns. The learning experience is from Everyday Mathematics.

  • Pumpkin Jack in the greenhouse Pumpkin Jack in the greenhouse
  • McGruff Preventing Drug UseMcGruff Preventing Drug Use
    Health Educator, Brenda Buntin from the Breathitt County Health Department visited our classroom. She presented an educational video “McGruff’s No Show”. The video focused on preventing drug use. Mc Gruff said “Constructive communication is one of the most effective tools in helping young children avoid drug use.” The presentation ended with “The best you can be is drug-free. That’s what it takes to be a winner for life.” We would like to thank Brenda for visiting our classroom.
  • Phonological AwarenessPhonological Awareness
    We would like to thank Mr. Wayne Sizemore for visiting our class. He worked with the students to help them acquire an understanding of phonological awareness. Students need to be able to manipulate syllables, onset and rime, and sounds if they are going to be successful in using letter-sound knowledge effectively for reading and writing. A student’s level of phonological awareness is a strong predictor of future reading success.
  • Sherriann visits our classroomSherriann visits our classroom

     

    Community member, Sheriann Spencer visited our classroom and read the book “Chicka, Chicka, Boom, Boom by Bill Martin, Jr. and John Archambault.  Before she read the story, Sherriann asked the students to identify the parts of the book. After listening to the story the students identified the letters of the alphabet. We would like to thank Sheriann for visiting our classroom.

  • Fingerplay:Hurry, Hurry Drive That Fire Truck

    Hurry, Hurry, Drive that Fire Truck

    Hurry, hurry, drive that fire truck
    (Hands on steering wheel)
    Hurry, hurry, drive that fire truck
    Hurry, hurry, drive that fire truck
    Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
    (Ring bell)

    Hurry, hurry, turn the corner
    (Lean to the right)
    Hurry, hurry, turn the corner
    (Lean to the left)
    Hurry, hurry, turn the corner
    (Lean to the right and left)
    Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
    (Ring bell)

    Hurry, hurry, climb that ladder
    (Pretend to climb ladder)
    Hurry, hurry, climb that ladder
    Hurry, hurry, climb that ladder
    Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
    (Ring bell)

    Hurry, hurry, spray the water 
    (Pretend to spray hose)
    Hurry, hurry, spray the water
    Hurry, hurry, spray the water
    Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
    (Ring bell)

    Slowly, slowly, back to the station http://mathandreadinghelp.org/cimages/multimages/26/fire-station-truck.jpg
    (Lean slowly to the left and right)
    Slowly, slowly, back to the station
    Slowly, slowly, back to the station
    Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!
    (Ring bell)

  • What a Plant Needs to SurviveWhat a Plant Needs to Survive

    We discussed what a plant needs to survive and as a group sung the finger play: What a Plant Needs to Survive. The students used their sense of touch and sense of sight to examine a Lima bean. We place a Lima bean along with a damp paper towel in three clear Ziploc bags. These bags were placed in a sunny warm window, dark cold refrigerator and a warm dark cabinet. The students predicted which environment the Lima bean would grow the best in. We made a chart with their predictions so we can refer back to their predictions as we observe the seeds in three different environments.

    Finger Play:

    I’m a little bean sprout green and small soon I’ll be growing nice and tall. My roots are in the soil, the sun shines on me. I can feel the rain drops and I have air to breath.


  • MulticulturalMulticultural
    Latino Boy Global Ceremonial Costume
  • September 13, 2013 PAT MeetingSeptember 13, 2013 PAT Meeting

    September 13, 2013

    The class had a lot of parent participation during the first “Parents As Teachers” meeting. The parents worked with their child in various areas of the classroom. Some of the activities engaged in were: puzzles, sorting, number boards with pegs, art, reading, magnetic letters-selecting the child’s name using a model of their name, ‘The Five Senses Game”, patterns, music, life skills, bristle blocks, sorting plastic food into food groups, latch board and etc.  We also enjoyed a snack provided by Family Resource Center Coordinator, Ms. Debra . We would like to thank the parents for wanting to learn about the Early Childhood Standards and engaging in the instructional program. We will have our next “PAT” meeting on October 11th

    http://kidsnow.ky.gov/engaging-families/Pages/Parent-Guides.aspx

    BUILDING A STRONG FOUNDATION

    FOR SCHOOL SUCCESS : THE KENTUCKY EARLY CHILDHOOD STANDARDS  :

    This guide was created based on the Kentucky Early Childhood Core Content Standards. It provides information about the standards, what the standards mean and ways you can help your child develop important skills. Highlighted in this guide is “Approaches to Learning.” Each page includes activities that you can do with your child to encourage them to learn in ways that will keep them interested and engaged.

     

     

  • Embracing MulticulturalismEmbracing Multiculturalism
    The students enjoy wearing multicultural clothing during choice time. This allows the students to have awareness and an acceptance of diversity.
  • Understands ShapesUnderstands Shapes

    This student is able to identify the circle, rectangle, square and triangle. When asked she successfully pointed to each shape. She is able to describe the circle, rectangle and square. She said "Circle round and round no straight sides." "Rectangle two long, two short sides, two and two more equal four." "Square four equal sides."


  • Connects numerals with their quantitiesConnects numerals with their quantities

    This student is able to verbally count to ten and successfully counts five objects using one number for each object. He is able to state how many is in the group of objects. When asked "How many is in this group?" He answered "Five".


  • Notices and Discriminates RhymeNotices and Discriminates Rhyme

    This student is able to fill in the missing rhyming word; and generate rhyming words spontaneously. She was holding a parrot puppet and when asked “What rhymes with parrot?”  She said “Carrot."


  • WICKIUP WICKIUP
  • Feelings GraphFeelings Graph

    The students enjoy participating in our feeling graph. Each Monday we begin a group discussion about the various way children feel about coming to school. The columns are labeled with a range of emotions such as happy, sad and scared. Each student will recognize their name and place it in the column that best describes how they felt about coming to school. After the graph is complete we count and record the number in each column. We discuss and label which column has the least, the most, or are they equal. This learning experience is from Everyday Mathematics. The objective is to help children create a graph to show their feeling about coming to school, using their names to represent information. Key Mathematics Concepts and Skills are: *count data on a graph, * Compare data on a graph, * Represent data on a graph, *Use a graph to get information and answer questions.


  • Pumpkin JackPumpkin Jack

    The students enjoyed listening to the story Pumpkin Jack written and illustrated by Will Hubbell. The story discusses the plant's life cycle throughout the seasons. After listening to the story, the students used their sense of touch to examine a small pumpkin. We plan to keep the pumpkin in our classroom, observe it as it decomposes and then plant it in the greenhouse. In spring we will check to see if any pumpkin sprouts emerge. Each student will take a pumpkin sprout home to plant in their own garden. The students enjoyed this activity last year and have been observing the pumpkin plant growing in our playground from last year’s science experiment. We would like to thank Ms. Leanna Mullins for donating the story to our classroom.

     

  • PUMPKIN JACKPUMPKIN JACK

    We would like to thank Ms. Arminda Herald for helping us with this learning experience.

  • Three dimensional artworkThree dimensional artwork
    During creative expression the students worked on three-dimensional artwork. They used a variety of recycled material such as bottle lids, cups, plastic yogurt cups, play dough cans, straws, styrofoam trays and a variety of papers. This is an open-ended learning experience and is best practices in early childhood.
  • The Seven ContinentsThe Seven Continents
     

    The students enjoyed singing The Seven Continents at the Breathitt County Board of Education’s regular meeting. The students were dressed in multicultural clothing to demonstrate an awareness and acceptance of diversity. We would like to thank the students’ parents for bringing them. As always, we appreciate your support.
  • Counting MatsCounting Mats
    The students enjoyed working with the counting mats. This learning experience helps promote the following important developmental skills.
    ·       Recognizing and naming numbers 1-10
    ·       Counting from 1-10 and beyond
    ·       Identifying and placing numbers in sequence 1-10
    ·       Tracing and writing number 1-10
    ·       Beginning to do simple addition and subtraction
  • Humpty Dumpty Science ExperimentHumpty Dumpty Science Experiment
    Humpty Dumpty is a basic nursery rhyme that many preschoolers know. Preschool Humpty Dumpty activities do more than just entertain students; they can help students develop their artistic, scientific and spacial skills as well. Preschoolers may need a visual demonstration to understand what happened to Humpty Dumpty when he fell off the wall.
    The students were eager to participate in our Humpty Dumpty learning experience. We stacked six large cardboard blocks to form a wall and placed two eggs on the top of the wall. One egg was cooked and the other one was a raw egg. Next, we placed the nursery rhyme chart Humpty Dumpty beside the wall and recited the nursery rhyme. The students were asked to predict what would happen when we dropped the eggs off the wall. The students watched as both eggs fell off the wall and then examine the eggs at the bottom of the wall.
    The students predicted which egg would crack and come out of the shell. Their predictions were written on the white board. After the experiment we referred back to the predictions and discussed why the boiled egg stayed in the shell and the raw one did not.
  • Humpty Dumpty  Humpty Dumpty
  • Humpty Dumpty  Humpty Dumpty
  • Humpty Dumpty  Humpty Dumpty
  • Humpty Dumpty Humpty Dumpty
  • Humpty Dumpty  Humpty Dumpty
  • Humpty Dumpty  Humpty Dumpty
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  • Science ExperimentScience Experiment
  • Science ExperimentScience Experiment
  • WICKIUP WICKIUP
  • Ms. Heather Spencer Ms. Heather Spencer
  • Healthy Habits Healthy Habits
  • Healthy HabitsHealthy Habits
    Ms. Heather Spencer from the Breathitt County Extension Office visited our classroom. She read the following books: Trick or Treat Tales The Beast Who Couldn’t Say Boo by Amanda Agree and  Clarabella’s Teeth by An Vrombaut. She discussed the importance of brushing our teeth at least twice day and eating healthy snacks. Ms. Spencer provided a healthy snack of popcorn and dried fruit. Each student had an informative paper to take home with tips about teeth brushing and making bright white smiles. We would like to thank Ms. Spencer for visiting our classroom.
  • Music ShakersMusic Shakers
    The students enjoyed making music shakers and were excited to take them home. We made three additional music shakers to use in our classroom during music activities. These advanced music experiences help extend the students understanding of music.
    Supplies you need:
    Materials Needed:
    ·         Water Bottle
    ·         Rice
    ·         Dried beans
    ·         Split peas
    ·         Colored plastic straws
    ·          Funnel
    ·         Glue
    Instructions:
    Start out by cleaning the bottle well and removing the label. Make sure the bottle is totally dry before you start this project.
    Place the end of the funnel into the bottle and start filling it! Start out with about a cup of beans and peas. You can add more or less if you like. Then, start adding any small items you would like to 'search' for in the bottle. It can be beads, colored plastic straws cut in small pieces. You can also add some sparkle to your bottle by adding glitter or sequins.
     
  • Music ShakersMusic Shakers

  • Our current standards-based unit of study is celebrations around the world. The essential question is: How are other cultures similar\different than my own culture? We have been discussing Hanukkah, which is a Jewish holiday. For a hands on learning experience the students played the dreidel game .
    How to play the dreidel game:
    1. Assemble a kitty. The stakes in a dreidel game aren't money, but tasty snacks- gelt, that is, foil-wrapped chocolate coins. Distribute the kitty equally among the three, four, or more players in the game. Each player puts one of his "tokens" in the center of the table, creating the dreidel "pot."
    2. Have each player spin the dreidel in turn. If you look closely at the dreidel, you'll see that each of its four sides is decorated with a different Hebrew letter: nun, gimel, hey, and shin-which supposedly stand for the Hebrew phrase meaning "A great miracle happened there."
    3. The rest of the game proceeds as follows: if the player spins a "Nun," he\she collects nothing ("Nisht" in Yiddish) and yields to the next player. If he\she spins a "Gimel," he\she wins the entire pot (Gimel stands for "Gesht," which is Yiddish for "get.") If he\she spins a "Hey," he\she gets half the pot ("Halb" in you-know what), and if he\she spins a "Shin" he\she has to put one of their own pieces in the pot ("Shin" derives from the Yiddish "Shtel," meaning "set.")
  • Straw PaintingStraw Painting
    The students enjoyed creating colorful paintings. They blew through a straw to move the paint around on the paper. The students notice where the colors met and pointed out how the colors mix to make new colors at certain points. The students were encouraged to keep blowing at the colors to see how the design would change.
  • ScienceScience
    The students were eager to participate in our science experiment: heavier\lighter, sink\float. We put water in a small container and placed it in the freezer until the next day; we used the same size container and filled it with water. Each student was asked to predict which container was heaver\lighter. Eight of the nine students said the container of ice was heavier than the container of water. We used our classroom scales to see which container was heavier. The container of water is heavier than the same size container full of ice.
    We put water and the block of ice in a plastic pan and observed as it floated in the water. Water is made up of many small particles called molecules. In water they are packed tightly together. The molecules in ice are not packed so tightly together. Even though they take up more space they are lighter. Since ice is lighter than water, it floats.
  • Science FunScience Fun
    Sink\Float
  • Creative ExpressionCreative Expression
    Early Childhood Development in Art
     
    By Lina Schofield
     “Art is an asset used to supplement early childhood education by enhancing the development of social, cognitive and motor skills in an enjoyable and expressive way. By learning how to make creative choices to carry out the completion of a project, children find their personal passion through their work and efforts. Art assists in making children more balanced and well-rounded as individuals on the path of learning and self-discovery.

     Cognitive Development
    • Decision making and sensory exploration are the foremost techniques young artists utilize to create art. These traits relate to cognitive development because they promote learning through examination and cause and effect. Art gives children the opportunity to test out different options and methods in a safe and open way where they don't face negative repercussions. Reflecting on their work provides children with the ability to self-examine and analyze, usually promoting further improvement and growth. Children also learn that art is an alternative form of communication. Eventually these basic techniques grow and evolve into the use of symbolism to portray thoughts and emotions.
    Social Development
    • Art is an essential tool in fostering self-esteem and pride. The sense of accomplishment that children feel after they have made something using their own skills helps them mature by expanding on their level of independence. Children rely on adults to meet most of their basic needs and therefore rarely have the opportunity to do activities completely on their own for safety purposes. They can feel limited and stifled for this reason, and art provides an opportunity for them to have complete control over what they are doing, which they tend to view as gaining a sense of independence. Praise received for their accomplishments from peers and adults alike also helps boost their confidence and self-esteem, which contributes to the overall happiness of children.
     
     
    Self-Expression
    • Self-expression helps children vent their emotions in a healthy and organized way. Children who have difficulty coping with their emotions in an acceptable manner can use art to better acclimate to societal and cultural standards. Artistic expression can also aid children faced with negative situations at an early age by giving them the tools to communicate about grief or stress their limited vocabulary cannot.
    Motor Skills
    • Art provides many opportunities for the expansion of motor skills for young children. Large papers or canvases encourage children to cover the space by using a range of larger movements involving the function of the entire arm. Coordination and muscle tone improve when creating artistic projects. Children use fine motor skills when they draw small details, work with clay or cut paper with scissors.
    Appreciation
    • It is extremely beneficial for young children to witness the artistic creations of others. This helps them formulate new creative ideas and opinions and allows them to better conceptualize their own work. Taking trips to view exhibits at local museums and art shows is one method to incorporate that enhances art appreciation in children.”
  • i SAFEi SAFE
     
    We would like to thank Ms. Kincannon for helping educate the students about internet safety-I SAFE and introducing the names for the various parts of a computer system: mouse,keyboard, computer/CPU, monitor/screen, etc…
    According to the web site i-SAFE “is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating and empowering youth (and others) to safely, responsibly and productively use Information and Communications Technologies (ICT). i-SAFE's best practices classroom curriculum for primary and secondary school students is embedded with dynamic community outreach activities to empower students, teachers, parents, law enforcement professionals, and other community members to control their online experiences by proficiently and independently exercising a learned and practiced ability to use the Internet and other ICT with a level of sophistication that results in increased safety and utility”.
  • AlphafriendsAlphafriends
    ALPHAFRIENDS Letters and Language Kit:
    • Phonological Awareness
    • Alphabet Recognition
    • Print  Awareness
    • Beginning Phonics
    • Fine Motor
  • Outdoor Time:Outdoor Time:
    The student’s enjoyed listening to the story “The Listening Walk” by Paul Showers. The students identified the parts of the book and answered questions about the story. The group also discussed the things they heard in the outdoor environment. The outdoor classroom is a valued resource in which the students can learn in an authentic setting which connects academics from the classroom to outside.
  • BUS SAFETY
    The preschool students are excited to have the opportunity to be exposed to and learn to a secondary language: Spanish. Spanish is embed in our daily routines. The students are greeted each morning in Spanish, count in Spanish, singing the months of the year and days of the week in Spanish. They are learning to identify colors in Spanish. This additional learning experience enhances our preschool program.
    Preschool age children have an innate capacity to process and use several languages. Once they have mastered one language, it is easier for them to learn other languages. Research in this area has demonstrated children can absorb this teaching during the preschool years. It is during this time that learning another language is actually optimal. Children are more able to pick up multilingual teaching at this time. This is mainly due to the development of the brain.
  • BUS SAFETY: Perfect Passenger AwardBUS SAFETY: Perfect Passenger Award
    The students proudly display their PERFECT PASSENGER AWARD. This certificate is awarded for learning the school bus safety rules and being a good school bus passenger. We would like to thank the Breathitt County bus garage for the certificates.
  • School Bus SafetySchool Bus Safety
    The student's listened to the story; "A Bully Free Bus" by Pamela Hall. Bullying behaviors are learned at an early age, so it is more than important than ever to reach the youngest audience and educate them on what bullying behavior is and how it is stopped. A Bully-Free Bus follows a group of young characters from Niceville Elementary School who bully each other on Bus 21. Young readers will learn about physical and verbal bullying. They will see four examples of bullying and learn how to stand up for themselves and be upstanders for others. They will also learn when to report a situation to an adult and other key advice in order to make a Bully-Free Bus! Real-life situations that children will relate to are brought to life with engaging cartoon illustrations.
  • Healthy HabitsHealthy Habits
    Health Educator, Brenda Buntin from the Breathitt County Health Department visited our classroom. She read the story Germs Make Me Sick! by Melvin Berger. She demonstrated proper hand washing procedures. We would like to thank Ms. Buntin for visiting our classroom and teaching the students about healthy habits.
  • Healthy Habits Healthy Habits
  • Math and Language Board GamesMath and Language Board Games

    The students enjoyed listening to the story Corduroy by Don Freeman. After hearing the story, the students played a math board game they had to roll a dice, count the number of dots (pips) and move their game piece (bear) along the paw prints towards the button. The student landing on the button first is the winner. Creating games based on books is one way to provide math experiences. Moving from space to space along a game board supports one-to-one correspondence and rolling dice allows for counting with meaning

    Integrating mathematics and literacy creates an interweaving of curriculum rather than a compartmentalizing of academic subjects. Many children’s books provide a natural, meaningful path for exploring and exchanging ideas about math concepts. Also, as the students often read favorite books again and again, if a math activity is based on a familiar story line, the math experience can be recalled as the book is being read, providing a powerful mental connection for remembering concepts and skills.

     


  • TEPEETEPEE
      

  • Male student as a pilgrim boyMale student as a pilgrim boy
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  • Our standards-based unit of study for the month of November is: Native Americans. The students have been listening to stories about Native Americans and the Pilgrims.
    We have discussed the different types of homes the Native Americans lived in such as  teepees, longhouse, igloo; and Wickiup. We would like to thank Ms. Thomas for helping us learn about the different types of shelters. A Native American tribe's location and culture were important factors in the tribe's housing designs. Certain housing structures were easy to build and take down, making it convenient for tribes who were nomadic and frequently changed the location of their village. Other homes were for societies who did not have to be as mobile. Native Americans also utilized surrounding forests and animals skins to build their homes.
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  • Pilgims Pilgims
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  • LonghouseLonghouse
      

  • LonghouseLonghouse
  • WICKIUP WICKIUP
  • WICKIUPWICKIUP

  • Favorite Seasons GraphFavorite Seasons Graph
    The students enjoy participating in our favorite season’s graph. The students are asked to choose their favorite season. The columns are labeled with the four season’s spring, summer, fall and winter. Each student will recognize their name and place it in the column of their favorite season. After the graph is complete we count and record the number in each column. We discuss and label which column has the least, the most, or are they equal. This learning experience is from Everyday Mathematics. The objective is to help children create a graph using their names to represent information. Key Mathematics Concepts and Skills are: *Count data on a graph, * Compare data on a graph, * Represent data on a graph, *Use a graph to get information and answer questions.
  • Mr. Bowling and Travis Combs visit our classroom.Mr. Bowling and Travis Combs visit our classroom.
    Mr. Bowling and Travis Combs from the Breathitt County Public Library visited our classroom. They provided a craft for each student and read the following stories:
    The Snappy Little Dragon by Beth Harwood:
    The leaves have been raked, the table's been set, and the Snappy Town parade is ready to begin. Little ones learn about the traditions of this special holiday as they help their furry and feathered friends get ready for the big day. In this brightly colored pop-up book with engaging rhyming text, delightful autumn scenes pop off the pages and invite children to bob for apples, frolic in fallen leaves, and cook up a feast to share with friends.
    RUN! TURKEY, RUN! by Diane Mayr:
    Thanksgiving is only a day away. Can Turkey find a place to hide from the farmer searching for a plump bird for his feast? If the farmer doesn’t fall for his tricks, there’s only one think left to do . . . run, Turkey, run! We would like to thank them for visiting our classroom.
     
  • Celebrations Around the WorldCelebrations Around the World
    This month we will be discussing the following Standards-Based Unit of Study: Celebrations Around the World. The essential question is: How are other cultures similar\different from my culture? We will be discussing Hanukkah, Kwanzaa and Christmas.
    The students are becoming familiar with Kwanzaa, which is an African American holiday: a cultural and harvest festival. They enjoyed learning about the Kwanzaa place mat Mkeka, one of the seven symbolic items of the African-American Kwanzaa holiday.The mkeka is the mat upon which all other six Kwanzaa symbols rest. It represents an African saying that "no matter how high a house is built, it must stand on something."
  • Dreidel gameDreidel game
    The students took turns playing the dreidel game which involves spinning a wooden top and following the instructions that are written on the top. This is a game that celebrates Hanukkah.
    How to play the dreidel game.
    1. Assemble a kitty. The stakes in a dreidel game aren't money, but tasty snacks- gelt, that is, foil-wrapped chocolate coins. Distribute the kitty equally among the three, four, or more players in the game. Each player puts one of his "tokens" in the center of the table, creating the dreidel "pot."
    2. Have each player spin the dreidel in turn. If you look closely at the dreidel, you'll see that each of its four sides is decorated with a different Hebrew letter: nun, gimel, hey, and shin-which supposedly stand for the Hebrew phrase meaning "A great miracle happened there."
    3. The rest of the game proceeds as follows: if the player spins a "Nun," he\she collects nothing ("Nisht" in Yiddish) and yields to the next player. If he\she spins a "Gimel," he\she wins the entire pot (Gimel stands for "Gesht," which is Yiddish for "get.") If he\she spins a "Hey," he\she gets half the pot ("Halb" in you-know what), and if he spins a "Shin" he\she has to put one of his own pieces in the pot ("Shin" derives from the Yiddish "Shtel," meaning "set.")
  • "The Food Groupie Adventures" "The Food Groupie Adventures"

     

    Ms. Brenda Buntin from the Breathitt County Health Department visited our classroom and presented an educational video about food groups and healthy habits. "The Food Groupie Adventures" This lively puppet show features the five friendly Food Groupie puppets Bread, Orange, Broccoli, Milk and Peanut. They visit a farm and explain to Robbie & Jenifer where foods come from and which food group they are in. They also explore interesting health and science topics. The Food Groupies encourage children to eat a variety of foods each day and show how different foods help their bodies. We would like to thank Ms. Buntin for visiting our classroom and look forward to her next visit.

  • “Super Heroes Who Help Kids Help Themselves to Make Healthy Choices vs. Smoking The Stop’em Starting Series.”

     

    Ms. Brenda Buntin from the Breathitt County Health Department visited our classroom and discussed healthy habits. Ms. Buntin used an educational video: “Super Heroes Who Help Kids Help Themselves to Make Healthy Choices vs. Smoking The Stop’em Starting Series.”   This video is designed to reach young students with simple, straight forward information about smoking before they are pressured to try it. These fun characters catch the students’ attention and make them laugh, while also teaching the important lessons about the dangers of substance abuse.  

  • The students are learning Spanish
    The preschool students are excited to have the opportunity to be exposed to and learn to a secondary language: Spanish. Spanish is embed in our daily routines. The students are greeted each morning in Spanish, count in Spanish, singing the months of the year and days of the week in Spanish. They are learning to identify colors in Spanish. This additional learning experience enhances our preschool program.
    Preschool age children have an innate capacity to process and use several languages. Once they have mastered one language, it is easier for them to learn other languages. Research in this area has demonstrated children can absorb this teaching during the preschool years. It is during this time that learning another language is actually optimal. Children are more able to pick up multilingual teaching at this time. This is mainly due to the development of the brain.
  • 9-13-13 PAT 9-13-13 PAT
  • Parent Guides for Children Three and FOur Years Old

    Parents\Guardains you can  download a Parent Guide for Children Three and Four Year Old using the link below.

    BUILDING A STRONG FOUNDATION FOR SCHOOL SUCCESS :

    THE KENTUCKY EARLY CHILDHOOD STANDARDS  :

    This guide was created based on the Kentucky Early Childhood Core Content Standards. It provides information about the standards, what the standards mean and ways you can help your child develop important skills. Highlighted in this guide is “Approaches to Learning.” Each page includes activities that you can do with your child to encourage them to learn in ways that will keep them interested and engaged.

    http://kidsnow.ky.gov/engaging-families/Pages/Parent-Guides.aspx

  • The Five SensesThe Five Senses
    The students working with the sort and match science game, The Five Senses. Students explore all five senses with this easy to play game!
    Target standard in these areas:
    ·       Identifying and using the five senses.
    ·       Sorting by attribute
    ·       Matching pictures with words.
  • The Five SensesThe Five Senses

    This student taste a piece of a lemon and said "It is sour and bitter".

  •                                                     The Five Senses The Five Senses
    The Sense of Taste
    During the month of September our standards-based unit of study is The Five Senses. The students used their sense of taste to experience salty, sweet, and sour\bitter food. Each student tasted a slice of a lemon, a piece of candy, some popcorn and a pinch of salt. They were able to identify each taste and state which one was their favorite.  As the popcorn was being prepared the  the students said they could hear it popping.  They were able to see, touch\feel the popcorn, taste and smell the popcorn.We sung "The Five Senses" 

     Five Senses 
     (Tune: Where is Thumbkin)

     Five senses, five senses
     We have them. We have them.
     Seeing, hearing, touching,
     Tasting and smelling.
     There are five. There are five.

    Point to the parts of the body as you sing.

  • Bus Safety Bus Safety
  •                       Bus Safety Bus Safety

    Driver Trainer, Mr. Scotty Spicer discussed bus rules and safety procedures. The students practiced loading and unloading the bus using the hand rail. Mr. Spicer explained the bus rules and that the rules were established to keep everyone safe. The students practiced crossing in front of the bus so the driver had a visual of them. Bus driver, Bobby Mullins took the students for a ride to allow them to demonstrate appropriate behavior while riding the bus. We would like to thank Mr. Spicer and bus driver, Bobby Mullins for helping the students become familiar with bus safety procedures.

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Bus Monitor, Arlina Spencer Bus Monitor, Arlina Spencer
  • Parents as Teachers

     

    Highland-Turner Elementary

    10355 Highway 30 West

     

    Booneville, KY 41314

     
     

    Principal: Robert Stewart

    606-295-7128

    August 27, 2013

    Parents/Guardians:

    We would like to invite you to come to school once a month on a Friday (the second Friday in each month) for at least an hour and work with your child. The time will be from 1:30-2:30. We would like to for you to become familiar with the Early Childhood Standards and engage in the instructional program.

    Types of activities implemented: A lot of the activities will be open-ended, which is developmentally appropriate for early childhood. Open-ended:  items that can be used in various ways, for extended lengths of time, with no structured layout needed (although help could be offered, as needed, of course). Open-ended activities focus on the process, not the product, foster independence, self-esteem and allows the student to experience success. Additional learning experiences or activities: sorting, puzzles, creating color patterns, shape patterns, forming letters and numbers, word blocks, word families, lacing cards, reading etc.

    Please download a Parent Guide for Children Three and Four Year Old http://kidsnow.ky.gov/engaging-families/Pages/Parent-Guides.aspx

     

    BUILDING A STRONG FOUNDATION

    FOR SCHOOL SUCCESS : THE KENTUCKY EARLY CHILDHOOD STANDARDS  :

    This guide was created based on the Kentucky Early Childhood Core Content Standards. It provides information about the standards, what the standards mean and ways you can help your child develop important skills. Highlighted in this guide is “Approaches to Learning.” Each page includes activities that you can do with your child to encourage them to learn in ways that will keep them interested and engaged.

    Family Resource Center Coordinator, Deb Johnson will provide snacks and drinks during your visit.

     

     

    FRIDAY DATES:

    1. September 13, 2013
    2. October 11, 2013
    3. November 8, 2013
    4. December 13, 2013
    5. January 10, 2014
    6. February 14, 2014
    7. March 14, 2014
    8. April 11, 2014

     

  • PAT September 13, 2013PAT September 13, 2013

    September 13, 2013

    The class had a lot of parent participation during the first “Parents As Teachers” meeting. The parents worked with their child in various areas of the classroom. Some of the activities engaged in were: puzzles, sorting, number boards with pegs, art, reading, magnetic letters-selecting the child’s name using a model of their name, ‘The Five Senses Game”, patterns, music, life skills, bristle blocks, sorting plastic food into food groups, latch board and etc. We enjoyed a snack provided by Family Resource Center Coordinator; Ms. Debra Johnson. We would like to thank the parents for wanting to learn about the Early Childhood Standards and engaging in the instructional program. We will have our next “PAT” meeting on October 11th.

     http://kidsnow.ky.gov/engaging-families/Pages/Parent-Guides.aspx

    BUILDING A STRONG FOUNDATION

    FOR SCHOOL SUCCESS : THE KENTUCKY EARLY CHILDHOOD STANDARDS  :

    This guide was created based on the Kentucky Early Childhood Core Content Standards. It provides information about the standards, what the standards mean and ways you can help your child develop important skills. Highlighted in this guide is “Approaches to Learning.” Each page includes activities that you can do with your child to encourage them to learn in ways that will keep them interested and engaged.

     

     

  • Fire Safety and FallFire Safety and Fall
    During the month of October we will be discussing the following Standards-Based Units of
    Study: Fire Safety/Fall. The essentials questions are: How do I protect myself in case of a fire? How does the changing season affect my own environment?
    The books read and learning experiences implemented will enhance the concepts taught. We have been discussing the emergency number 911. The will be discussing fire safety procedures.  The students are enjoying singing the finger plays: Hurry, hurry drive that fire truck and Four Seasons Make up the Year.
  • Rhyme TimeRhyme Time

    Expanding Vocabulary with Rhyming Games:

    The preschool students have been learning rhyming words. We have a learning experience called “Odd man out”. The student has to select the card with the word that doesn’t rhyme. Rhyming is one of the first skills that children can practice to start understanding letter-sound-word relationships and can be a fun way to expand early vocabulary by building on familiar word patterns that children are already comfortable with. Rhyming helps children start to pay attention to the sounds in words, which is an important first step in learning to read. We would like to thank Ms. Paula Gross for sharing this educational activity.

  • Fire SafetyFire Safety
    The students felt of the door with the back of their hand to find out if it was hot. They started from the bottom of the door and went up towards the top. The fire fighter told them to never open their bedroom door if it felt hot or warm like this door did because the fire was on the other side of the door,
  • Fire SafetyFire Safety
    The Jackson Fire Department firefighters visited our school and discussed fire safety procedures. They told the students the following fire survival facts: stay low and go to an exit if the room is filled with smoke, develop and practice a fire escape plan, install and maintain smoke alarms, never play with matches or other devices that can start a fire, once you are out of the structure stay out, never go back in for anything, the emergency number 911 and stop, drop, cover and roll. They also discussed the fire fighter gear and how it protects a firefighter. The students went through the Fire Safety House and practiced fire safety procedures.This learning experience supports our current standards-based unit of study: Fire Safety and provides an answer to our essential question: How do I protect myself in case of a fire? We would like to thank the fire fighters for visiting our school.
  • Canoe Volunteer Fire DepartmentCanoe Volunteer Fire Department
    The Canoe Volunteer Fire Department visited our school and discussed fire safety procedures. They told the students the following fire survival facts: stay low and go to an exit if the room is filled with smoke, develop and practice a fire escape plan, install and maintain smoke alarms, never play with matches or other devices that can start a fire, once you are out of the structure stay out, never go back in for anything, the emergency number 911 and stop, drop, cover and roll. They also discussed the fire fighter gear and how it protects a firefighter. The students went outside and sat in the Fire Truck. We sung the fingerplay “Hurry, Hurry Drive that Fire Truck” This learning experience supports our current standards-based unit of study: Fire Safety and provides an answer to our essential question: How do I protect myself in case of a fire? We would like to thank firefighters Bernard Spencer, Erin Terry and Cindy Salyers for visiting our school.
  • Ms. Heather Spencer visits our classroomMs. Heather Spencer visits our classroom
    Ms. Amy Spicer from the Breathitt County Extension Office visited our classroom. She read the book Count on Pablo by Barbara deRubertis.   Pablo eagerly helps Abuela prepare to sell vegetables at the farmer's market. At first, no one comes to buy, but when Pablo suggests they let customers sample the vegetables in a delicious salsa, sales soar. As part of this story, children can practice skip counting by 2s, 5s and 10s. Math Matters books help children make the connection between math and their everyday world.  Ms. Spicer also provided salsa and chips for each student. As they enjoyed this delicious snack, we discussed how we were using all five senses to create an impression of the salsa, whether pleasant or unpleasant, unique or bland. We would like to thank Ms. Spicer for visiting our classroom.

  • Ms. Amy Spicer from the Breathitt County Extension Office visited our classroom.
  • "AT" Word Family"AT" Word Family
    The students have been working hard to identify the “at” word family. The classroom has a word family pocket chart. The students take turns selecting a beginning letter, identifying the letter and the sound it produces. The beginning letter is placed in a pocket to create words in the “at” word family. Word families are groups of words that have a common feature or pattern. They have some of the same combinations of letters in them and a similar sound.

     

    Implementing word family learning experiences with the whole class or a small group builds phonemic awareness, a key to success in reading. Students will see how words look alike at the end and if they sound alike at the end.

  • AlphafriendsAlphafriends
    The students are becoming familiar with rhyming words, beginning\blending sounds and clapping sounds. We have implemented learning experiences from Houghton Mifflin PRE-K Alphafriends Letters and Language Kit.
    This research based language and literacy kit enhances any Pre-K classroom’s Letter Time or ABC Centers, which lets students experience letters and sounds through colorful images, purposeful songs, and delightful alphabet characters.  Alphafriends promotes letter recognition and phonological awareness.
    The students also used paint pads and letter stamps to place words with the same beginning\blending sounds, and rhyming words on paper. Their work is displayed throughout the classroom.
  • Lexia ReadingLexia Reading
    We would like to congratulate these students they have completed level 1 in Lexia Reading. Lexia Reading Core5™ is a technology-based reading program built specifically to meet the Common Core State Standards.

     

    The program provides explicit and in-depth instruction on the five areas of reading for students of all abilities in pre-K through grade 5. Built upon Lexia’s research-proven, award-winning methodology, Lexia Reading Core5 is the most comprehensive technology-based reading skills program available.

    The program provides a truly adaptive and individualized learning experience that enables students at every tier of instruction to advance their reading skills development. Lexia’s proprietary Assessment Without Testing® technology gathers performance data without stopping the flow of instruction to administer a test. Teachers and administrators receive real-time reports on individual student progress towards mastery of the standards, as well as student-specific action plans to provide intervention and improve performance on year-end assessments.

  • Lexia ReadingLexia Reading

    This student completed level 1 in Lexia reading.

  • Lexia ReadingLexia Reading

    These students completed level 1 in Lexia Reading.

  • Lexia ReadingLexia Reading

    This student completed level 2 in Lexia Reading.

  • Lexia ReadingLexia Reading

    These students completed level 1 in Lexia Reading

  • Building reading skills with Fairy Tales Masks and PlaysBuilding reading skills with Fairy Tales Masks and Plays

    The students enjoyed listening to the story “The Three Little Pigs”. Each student made character masks, had a copy of the read–along-story and was encouraged to retell the story to an adult at home. The goal of all reading is comprehension. Although there are many ways to monitor student comprehension, research shows that one of the best ways is retelling. Regular use of retellings improves students understanding of a specific text and of text forms in general. Retellings are also an ideal way to check children’s listening comprehension, reinforce and apply new vocabulary, evaluate overall depth of understanding and determine a student’s ability to organize information. Retellings allow you to see how well as well as how much information students retain after reading or hearing text.  In addition, they serve as a vital precursor to the development of summarization skills so critical in later grades.

  • March 14, 2014 PAT March 14, 2014 PAT
  • P.A.T Meeting March 14, 2014P.A.T Meeting March 14, 2014

    The class had great parent/family participation during the recent “Parents As Teachers” meeting. The parents/family members worked with their child in various areas of the classroom. Some of the activities engaged in were: puzzles, sorting, number boards with pegs, art, reading, magnetic letters-selecting the child’s name using a model of their name, patterns, music, life skills, bristle blocks, sorting plastic food into food groups, latch board and etc. The food was provided by Family Resource Center Coordinator; Ms. Debra Johnson. We would like to thank the parents and family members for attending. We will have our next “PAT” meeting on April 11th.

  • PAT March 14, 2014 PAT March 14, 2014
  • Read Across AmericaRead Across America

    Our school recently participated in Read Across America Day, a nationwide program that encourages adults to promote reading among children. The event coincides with the birthday of Theodor Seuss Geisel, known to many simply as “Dr. Seuss.”  This is a great way to remind students that it’s important to read, work on literacy, grammar and vocabulary. We would like to thank everyone that visited our classroom and read.

    The students enjoyed various activities related to the characters found in Dr. Seuss books. They made Thing One and Thing two characters after listening to “The Cat in the Hat” and were excited to create and wear the Cats red and white hat. At the end of the week, the students had a “Dr. Seuss” party and enjoyed a cake decorated by Brittany Sloas.

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      Highland-Turner Elementary
      10355 Highway 30 West
      Booneville, KY 41314
      Fax:606-295-2710